Saturday, 22 October 2016

'Boo! A Madea Halloween' Movie Reviews And News

In this article we write a complete information 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' hollywood movies. In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

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Hollywood 'Boo! A Madea Halloween' Movie Reviews And News:

Tyler Perry brings back his trademark drag character for this latest outing, set on the titular holiday.
Thanks, Chris Rock. Thanks a lot.

The idea for Tyler Perry's latest outing as his drag character Madea was inspired by a fake reference in Rock's movie Top Five. Supposedly, the title so tickled the folks at Lionsgate that they asked Perry to base a film on it. So now we have Boo! A Madea Halloween, which should scare up decent box-office returns through the titular holiday and, considering its obviously low budget, make a tidy profit in the process.

At this point, reviewing a Madea film is like a food critic reviewing the fare at McDonald's. By any objective standard, it's subpar, made of cheap ingredients and panders to the undiscriminating. But millions of people seem to love it, and happily come back for more.


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The latest adventure involving the sassy, tough-talking matriarch involves 17-year-old Tiffany (Diamond White), daughter of Madea's mild-mannered nephew Brian (Perry, again). Brian forbids Tiffany from attending a frat party with her friend Aday (Liza Koshy), and enlists his extended family of Madea, Aunt Bam (Cassi Davis), Hattie (Patrice Lovely) and Joe (Perry, yet again) to babysit. But the resourceful teen sneaks out of the house, forcing Madea and her female cronies to head to the frat house where, suffice it to say, hilarity does not ensue. Unless, that is, you think Madea exposing her breasts to the horrified young men is too funny for words.

Dutifully living up to its title, the film introduces mild horror elements, with Madea and her cohorts coming into contact with supernatural phenomena, an evil clown and zombies who chase them through the woods. Although there's a long cinematic tradition of mixing comedy with scares to excellent effect — Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein being a prime example — this lackluster effort manages to be neither funny nor scary.

Not that it will matter to the franchise's fans, who will no doubt roar at Aunt Bam stealing candy from a young trick-or-treater and gleefully showing off her medical marijuana card; the elderly Joe smoking a joint and referring to playing with himself; jokes about prostate exams; and the oldsters merrily cackling about the benefits of physically abusing children.

When Brian complains to his uncle Joe about being thrown off the roof when he was four years old, Joe accusingly asks him, "Did you die?"

'Too Close to Home'
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Attempting to reach younger audiences, Perry has cast several social media stars as the fraternity brothers, and a young female twerker who's had millions of views on YouTube. While they all look like they're having a fun time, whatever talents they may possess don't translate to the big screen.

Shot sitcom-style with multiple cameras and minimal takes, the film looks atrocious. It's disheartening that Perry, for all his obvious smarts and savvy, is unwilling to up his cinematic game. There's no arguing with the massive success he's had in film, television and theater, and he's clearly giving the people what they want. But the puerile humor that he continues to peddle makes awfully depressing viewing for those who don't find the concept of a large, middle-aged man in drag inherently funny.

Distributor: Lionsgate
Production companies: Lionsgate, Tyler Perry Studios
Cast: Tyler Perry, Cassi David, Patrice Lovely, Yousef Eraket, Lexy Panterra, Andre Hall, Brock O'Hurn, Liza Koshy, Diamond White, Kian Lawley, J.C. Caylen, Jimmy Tatro, Tyga, Bella Thorne
Director-screenwriter: Tyler Perry
Producers: Tyler Perry, Ozzie Areu
Director of photography: Richard Vialet
Art director: Shirley Inget
Editor: Larry Sexton
Costume designer: Crystal Hayslett
Composer: Elvin Ross
Casting: Kim Taylor-Coleman


Rated PG-13, 103 minutes

'I'm Not Ashamed Full Movie Reviews And News

In this article we write a complete information of 'I'm Not Ashamed hollywood movie news and reviews. In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

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Hollywood Movie 'I'm Not Ashamed Reviews:

The life of Rachel Scott, a victim of the shooters at Columbine High School, is turned into a big-screen pep talk for struggling Christian teens.
An ungenerous way to describe I'm Not Ashamed, a painfully earnest TV-grade movie about Columbine High School victim Rachel Scott, is that it has turned one of the most horrific events in American history into a mere plot device, using it to add prefabricated gravitas to an otherwise ordinary story of a teen's struggle to live according to her Christian beliefs.

Many won't see it that way: Scott's life and tragic death (and the journal she left behind) were the springboard for an anti-violence nonprofit that has given school presentations to tens of millions of students, and presumably many of those have embraced the comparisons made between Scott and Anne Frank. Many Christians yearning for faith-based entertainment will be moved by this film, and that crowd may well ensure a profit for the production. But more picky viewers will admit that even taken solely as an exploration of the trials of being a Christian teen, it's awfully weak tea as a movie, instantly disposable if not for the tragic backdrop. (Moviegoers who want a more affecting film about campus shootings this month should look instead to Keith Maitland's Tower.)

Played by Masey McLain, Rachel wavers between assertive chipperness about the impact she can have on others and a dark fear that she'll never quite fit in. At the start, she sits with friends lamenting "I just want a real boyfriend." Boys just don't think of her that way, it seems, which is odd, because she's the prettiest one in her popular-girl pack, as well as the most approachable.

Trying to make herself boy-worthy, Rachel sneaks out of the house, goes to parties, smokes and drinks. (Unlike so many contemporary movies that go out of their way to keep tobacco products offscreen, Ashamed has more conspicuous teen smoking than a Grease production underwritten by Philip Morris.) She gets caught at one point, and is sent to spend the summer with devout relatives in Louisiana; there, she has the first of multiple revivals of faith.

When she returns, Rachel tries to be more involved with a church youth group, where she winds up noticing a homeless young man (Ben Davies's Nathan), and essentially stalks him until he accepts her help. He becomes her surrogate big brother, embracing church in a big way. He should probably become her boyfriend as well, but Rachel's hung up on a theater bro named Alex. The film devotes a lot of energy to her budding maybe/maybe-not romance with Alex, who is giving her acting lessons with an eye to putting her in his upcoming school play.

If Rachel was, in fact, the kind of idealist the movie depicts, she probably would not object to her ensuing trials — brief spasms of loneliness; concerns that "having a walk with God is hard" in an unreligious world — being dramatized for the sake of others in her shoes. But as the movie cuts from time to time to its versions of the two teens who tried to kill hundreds of their classmates on April 20, 1999, the rest of us may have qualms, about both the shallowness of its depiction of mass shooters and about the use of this event to turn Rachel into a Christian martyr. A 2000 book about her used that word in its title, and the movie runs with the idea, implying that Scott's murder was an act of religious persecution — which would come as news to the victims of this indiscriminate act of hatred, who simply happened to be at the wrong school on the wrong day.



Production companies: Visible Pictures, All Entertainment

Distributor: Pure Flix Entertainment

Cast: Masey McLain, Ben Davies, Cameron McKendry, Terri Minton, Victoria Staley, Taylor Kalupa, Emma Elle Roberts, Sadie Robertson, David Errigo Jr., Cory Chapman, Mark Daugherty

Director: Brian Baugh

Screenwriters: Bodie Thoene, Philipa A. Booyens, Robin Hanley, Kari Redmond

Producers: Brad Allen, Nise Davies, Chuck Howard, Martin Michael

Executive producer: Benny Proffitt

Director of photography: John Matysiak

Production designer: Christian Snell

Costume designer: Vanessa Gonzalez

Editor: Chris Witt

Composer: Tim Williams

Casting director: Nise Davies

PG-13, 112 minutes